Art & Jim’s Machinery Shop: New Holland 479 Haybine Belt Change

Art & Jim’s Machinery Shop: New Holland 479 Haybine Belt Change

Art and Jim’s Machinery Shop

New Holland 479 Haybine Belt Change

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During the winter months, one of things you may find time to do is check over your haybine.  I use an older machine, a New Holland 479 Haybine (1972-1977).  It is a good old machine and if the rollers are in decent shape can provide years of service with little work.  I rebuilt one of mine it from the ground up in 2009, rebuilt a second machine  in 2012, and will rebuild a third in 2017.  I find them at auctions and can get them for just a few hundred dollars.  My focus is are they straight and do not have holes rusted in them, which are usually found near the sickle where old hay was not removed and gets wet and damaged the sheet metal.  I also examine that guards are present, good tires, and of course decent rollers. Belts are reasonably priced for this haybine…but the belt that goes around the wobble box, which drives the sickle bar is a bear, one of those engineering marvels where they did not quite think things through. That is why we have today’s model 488, New Holland needed to make a few adjustments to a darn good machine to make it better and a get questions from folks that contact me a lot about  changing the that belt on a New Holland 479 Haybine.

So, if the belt is worn and you have some down time due to rain,winter break or you unfortunately have the belt break and have never replaced one before, I would like to share some steps that should help get you going again.

First things first, safety…frankly I have the haybine hooked to the hitch of the tractor and the wheels on everything chocked.  Why, do I hook the haybine to the tractor and not just leave it to the haybine jack…well, as much as I like New Holland hay equipment, the jacks on the old 479 are not to be trusted with your life.  With things hooked up and chocked I feel much safer when I climb under the machine to do the work.  Always safety first!

Once you have all your tools together I would start by removing the shield over the slip clutch. Then remove the set screw that holds the slip clutch to the gearbox. Now remove the slip clutch assembly. The slip clutch assembly has always come loose fairly easily for me.  However, a friend has told me that was not the case for him and he had to remove the eight bolts and springs, then remove the PTO drive shaft from the slip clutch. He strongly suggested you measure the spring length before removal so you can set the springs at the same tension as they were when you removed them. Sounds like good advice to me.

Now you get to crawl under the rear of the haybine and by following the gearbox output shaft you see a bearing up on your left.  Remove the three (3) 3/8″ bolts holding the bearing to the plate. Now, when you look at that plate you will see four (4) 1/2″ nuts, DO NOT REMOVE THE FOUR (4) ½” NUTS…only remove the three (3) 3/8” nuts in the center of the plate. You do not need to remove anything else.

Now you move to the bolt and bushing that holds the sickle to the wobble box.  Remove the sickle bolt, the bushing should stay in place.  If it is tightened down and will not stay in place the sickle head is worn and will need to be replaced as well to keep you from wearing out bushings prematurely.

Now look under the wobble box. On the bottom side of the box you will see three (3) 1/2″ bolts. That go into the lower wobble box bearing mounting plate.  Remove these three (3) bolts.

Under this mounting plate is a spacer. Remove the spacer. Rotate the mounting plate 180 degrees so the narrow end is pointing to the outside. Also remove the belt from the upper pulley to provide some maneuvering room.  This should give you the slack needed to remove the belt from the wobble box pulley and work it out through the lower wobble box bearing mounting plate and support.  It may take a little rotation so the box so the plate moves away from the mounting.

Now you can stand up and brush yourself off and remove the 3/8” bolts (a bunch of them) that hold the gearbox mounting plate to the side of the machine. Luckily you got to remove two of these when you removed the shield, but now the rest have to come out as well.  Once you get all the bolts out you can pull the gearbox away from the machine, which may take a little wiggling to get the 2-3 inches you need to remove the belt from the top drive pulley.

Now slip the new belt through the opening and reinstall everything in reverse order.

The New Holland 479 is an old workhorse, but it will work just fine if the rollers are still in good shape and it is kept in the shed when not in use. The rollers hate the sun.  Follow the greasing recommendations and always keep all the shields in place for safety. The pictures below are the before and after shots of the  rebuilding and painting in 2009.  Five years later and it has mowed over 2000 acres of grass, clover, and alfalfa. I replaced the wobble box bearings in 2012, and a few sickle bar bushings in the past five years.  Other than that I have just replaced the usual blades and guards. The belts were replaced in 2009 during the rebuild and still look good.  You have to like that.  Enjoy your mowing and please… Always Be Safe!

I can also send a copy of the manual page to replace the belt in e-mail if that would be helpful, just contact me at HoosierHay@gmail.com.

 

New Holland 479 before Rebuild

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J.R. Brown
Written by J.R. Brown

Retired USAF SNCO, Hay & Cattle Farmer, GIS User, Antique Farm Machinery Collector, Favorite old iron...anything Oliver, Moline, Farmall, or Allis-Chalmers.

16 Comment responses

  1. Avatar
    August 31, 2017

    The above narrative description of a procedure for removing the V-belt that drives the wobble box of the New Holland Model 479 haybine is good for starters but it has some deficiencies that came to light when I applied it to removing the belt on my own model 479 haybine. First I disconnected the PTO drive shaft from the gear box splined shaft which required removal of a hex head allen wrench bolt so that the PTO shaft could slide off the gear box shaft. This was relatively easy requiring use of pry bar and a shop hammer to tap against the slip clutch to push the PTO drive shaft clear of the gear box shaft.

    For what its worth I should say a few words here about the concept for removing the belt which is fundamental to understanding why the procedure is what it is. It’s safe to say that the design engineers didn’t give a lot of forethought to the procedure needed for R&R of the drive V-belt given the extent to which the haybine must be disassembled for that purpose. Removal of the old belt (assuming it hasn’t come apart in the field while cutting) and thus by extension installation of the new belt in reverse amounts to getting the old belt off the wobble box pulley then around, under and away from the wobble box assembly. With all the slack and full extent of the belt then available, it must be taken from the inside out, around and away from the entire gear box assembly which includes the large L-shaped mounting plate to which the gear box is attached and used to secure it to the haybine frame. As you will see there are a good many 9/16 bolts all with nuts on the inside of the gear box mounting plate which will in almost all cases require a backup wrench to loosen and remove.

    While getting the belt around and away from the wobble box would appear relatively obvious and not so daunting (will nevertheless prove challenging), getting the belt off of the gear box drive pulley then around and away from the gear box assembly is not so readily obvious and will prove equally if not more of a daunting task than removal from the wobble box.

    Next up is removal of the 3 bolts (9/16) holding the gear box drive shaft bearing to the haybine frame as described in the narrative. Only those 3 bolts as stated clearly in the narrative must be removed while leaving in place the 4 bolts at each corner of the bearing attachment plate. Those 3 bolts are best reached from underneath the haybine (there is enough room to maneuver). Removal of those 3 bolts frees up the gear box input drive shaft and bearing assembly so that the gear box assembly with its attached L-shaped mounting plate can be pulled away from the haybine frame sufficient enough to allow the V-belt to be taken from the inside out and around the entire gear box assembly and clear of the haybine.

    Next up is disconnecting or removing from the applicable chain sprocket the roller drive chains. No mention is made of this necessity in the narrative (maybe it was thought too obvious by the writer) but it is necessary so that the gear box assembly will not be restrained as it is shifted away and out from the haybine frame the 2 or 3 inches needed later to enable removal of the belt as conceptually described above. I removed the chain tension idler sprocket for the upper roller chain which then allowed removal of the chain from the upper roller sprocket without disconnecting the chain at a master link. For the bottom roller chain I found it necessary to disconnect that chain at a master link (careful not to drop and lose the snap ring securing the master link) then let the chain droop loose. With all that done the gear box can now be shifted/wiggled out away from the haybine frame the needed 2 to 3 inches for later removal of the belt. Be careful not to allow the unattached gear box assembly to rotate such that gear box oil begins to drain from the service level sight hole. The V-belt can now be removed from the gear box drive pulley to the inside and allowed to rest on the drive shaft which creates needed slack for removing the belt from the wobble box which was the next step in my procedure.

    First disconnect the wobble box arm from the sickle then from under the wobble box (lying on your side or back), remove the three 3/4 inch stud bolts securing the lower portion of the wobble box to the haybine frame. As the aforesaid narrative explains those 3 bolts pass through a relatively thin spacer plate and then screw into a lower mounting plate (approx. 1/2 inch thick) upon which the wobble box rests and pivots/rotates laterally driving the sickle in and out for its cutting action. The word bearing is used in the aforesaid narrative but in actuality the mounting plate has a 1 inch diameter solid shaft that is 1 3/4 inches in length mounted to it and centrally located which extends up into the lower frame of the wobble box anchoring it and providing for its cyclical motion. The bottom of the wobble box frame can be pulled/rotated out to the full extent of its gimbal limits whence the thin lower spacer plate can be removed then the mounting plate with its shaft can be pulled away just clearing the haybine frame. This will take some playing around by moving the wobble box frame until the mounting plate falls clear. The space then created underneath the wobble box will allow the belt to be scooted under the wobble box frame and clear of it.

    With the full extent and slack of the belt now available it can be worked around the gear box assembly with its attached L-shaped frame rendering the belt finally clear of the haybine. The reverse procedure would be used to install a new belt. Good luck.

    Reply

    • Avatar
      September 01, 2017

      I need to add a minor clarification of something I said in the next to last paragraph. The mounting plate beneath the wobble box which along with the spacer that sits beneath the mounting plate (both must be removed) is a trapezoidal shape with parallel short and long sides. The short side is on the inside or facing toward the haybine. The long side is aligned with the outside edge of the wobble box frame as you look at. I also said that the pivoting shaft attached to the mounting plate which extends up into the wobble box frame and allows it to rotate and thus move the sickle arm in and out was centrally located on the mounting plate. The shaft is not located in the center of the mounting plate perse but is located midway along and near the outer edge of the longer side of the mounting plate. The reason the narrative refers to rotating the mounting plate 180 degrees is to enable removal of the plate once the wobble box frame with its mounting plate held in place by the shaft is pulled out at the bottom of its frame allowing the mounting plate to fall away or be pulled off without being blocked by the haybine frame beneath the wobble box. This will be clearer when you get to that point.

      Reply

    • Avatar
      January 03, 2018

      Thank you for the detailed input…appreciate the other set of eyes. I will make some changes to the article to reflect your input. Drop me a line, I would like to give you a coupon to a friends hay supply store. Take care and be safe.

      Reply

  2. Avatar
    July 22, 2017

    Thanks for a great article on belt replacement. I have a New Holland 477 Haybine and I have gone under it many times with just the jack supporting it. NOT ANY MORE! after having read your article. I did not realize it can be that dangerous. I have a problem that you guys might be able to help me with. How do I remove the gearbox from my haybine. I have a dual sprocket that is mounted on the output shaft of the gear box and the weld has broke on this sprocket (part # 285969). I need to remove this part but I dont know how. My machine looks identicle to your 479. Thanks

    Reply

    • Avatar
      January 03, 2018

      I picked up one at New Holland before…a little salty, but worth the expense as much as I use it. If you have an ag machinery salvage yard nearby that would be the other choice.

      Reply

  3. Avatar
    July 03, 2017

    do you know where I can get the wobble shaft for a nh 479 ?

    Reply

  4. Avatar
    July 22, 2015

    Any advice or tips on replacing the drive belt on a new holland 472 would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks, Jake

    Reply

    • Avatar
      July 22, 2015

      Hi Jake,

      All I have is a 479 manual and the 472 is a newer machine. I will send it to you, but I would also check out the New Holland parts manual breakdown and see if that gives you some ideas. It may be the 470 and the fear box has to separated from the chassis a few inches. Not hard but a bit time consuming for a belt repair. The manual will be one the way to your e-mail soon. Be safe around those machines, the haybine stands are not my favorites from a safety point of view. I also work on this machinery hooked to a tractor, chocked and the pto shaft unhooked from the tractor. Take care and be safe.

      Reply

  5. Avatar
    June 26, 2015

    Thank a lot for the replacement info, worked like a charm, Do you have any info on the proper tension for both belts on the haybine? Or just snug?

    Reply

    • Avatar
      June 27, 2015

      Great to hear…I tighten them just like a car belt…snug with a little give. Good luck and have a safe hay season…send us some pictures to post if you get a chance and if you sell some let us know.

      Reply

  6. Avatar
    June 25, 2015

    Nice work done on the haybine,looks brand new! bought an old one myself just need to change the springs and pins on the overrunning clutch,so do i need to remove the gearbox to do this job,any advice would be appreciated.

    Reply

    • Avatar
      June 27, 2015

      Should not have to worry about the gear box. When doing some tear downs the first time I go to the New Holland parts web site and look at the breakdown on the page… this is the 479 … http://partstore.agriculture.newholland.com/us/parts-search.html#epc::mr65853ag5466191 … then look under the PTO Assembly. New Holland Haybines are my favorite and I have used John Deere, Oliver, Gehl and New Holland. Good Luck and be safe

      Reply

  7. Avatar
    June 24, 2015

    In the e-mail folks…let me know you received it. It is a big file. Be safe and watch that old New Holland haybine Jack, those are not the safest design ever built. I stay hooked to a chocked tractor when working on it just to be safe. But I will say the old New Holland haybines are good cutters. Be safe.

    Reply

  8. Avatar

    please email me the information about replacing the belt on the 479 haybine . thank you

    Reply

  9. Avatar
    January 21, 2015

    Tremendously helpful article. Bought one of these older machines and did not have a manual. Also I agree with the jack stand part, those old stands are dangerous, people should keep the haybine hooked up to a tractor to be safe. Good Advice, you may may saved a life with that one.

    Reply

    • Avatar
      July 10, 2017

      We have a New Holland 479 that we have to change belt on Any information would be very helpful we have no manual on it so anything would help

      Reply

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